Everybody has a job

Wish mine could be to pilot a power-sail.

Wind power generation with a parawing on ships, a proposal” in Energy 35 (2010) 1425–1432 by J. Kim and C. Park

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Wikileaks releases the bestest leak

This is irony: Plan to take down a whistleblower clearing house put together by the DOD posted to said whistleblower site: Wikileaks.org:

I just received an email from Wikileaks editor Julian Assange that’s pretty wild. It accuses the U.S. government of deliberately trying to take down the whistle-blower site PDF two years ago.

As proof, Wikileaks has posted a 32-page classified document PDF from the Department of Defense Intelligence Analysis program, dated March 2008, which details “the counterintelligence threat posed to the US Army by the Wikileaks.org Web site.” It reads:

The possibility that a current employee or mole within DoD or elsewhere in the US government is providing sensitive information or classified information to Wikileaks.org cannot be ruled out. Wikileaks.org claims that the “leakers” or “whistleblowers” of sensitive or classified DoD documents are former US government employees. These claims are highly suspect, however, since Wikileaks.org states that the anonymity and protection of the leakers or whistleblowers is one of its primary goals.

The sad truth is that sites like Wikileaks and Cryptome exist because the mainstream media can no longer be trusted to assume its role as the “fourth estate.” Just one example: The New York Times sat on the NSA warrantless wiretapping story for a full year before running it, and nobody in the mainstream media wanted to touch AT&T whistle-blower Mark Klein before he handed his documents over to the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Continue reading here.

Download the PDF from Wikileaks here or here.

Continue reading “Wikileaks releases the bestest leak”

The ugliest side of (alcohol) prohibition

Although mostly forgotten today, the “chemist’s war of Prohibition” remains one of the strangest and most deadly decisions in American law-enforcement history. As one of its most outspoken opponents, Charles Norris, the chief medical examiner of New York City during the 1920s, liked to say, it was “our national experiment in extermination.” Poisonous alcohol still kills—16 people died just this month after drinking lethal booze in Indonesia, where bootleggers make their own brews to avoid steep taxes—but that’s due to unscrupulous businessmen rather than government order.

via Slate: The little-told story of how the U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition with deadly consequences.

Related reading:

1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prohibition_in_the_United_States
2. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v463/n7279/full/463299a.html