¡Oye, Mira! at SFAI’s Walter and McBean Galleries

Until June 8th, ¡Oye, Mira! will be up at SFAI:

¡Oye, Mira!: Reflective Approaches in Contemporary Latin American Video Art brings together a selection of artists from Latin America who use video as a tool of reflection and contemplation, exploring relationships of identity to site, history, and memory. These artists play an important role as mediators in the geo-political landscape, seeking to place their work within the context of place/site and the intersection of high culture and daily life. In the featured works, materiality, form, and concept come together in an expression of each artist’s personal values and experience of the world. These range from place-specific issues of social justice and political oppression to the universal concerns of love and family.

Featuring works from Cuba, Mexico, Argentina, Peru, and Bolivia, all created in the last 12 years, the exhibition considers a wide range of approaches to production and display, including the use of the “loop,” narrative structures, sculptural installations/environments, and dialogues with complementary two-dimensional works. Audience participation will also be an integral part of the exhibition through an interactive video lounge and café, and live performances and dancing during the opening reception.

Since the early 1970s, the New Genres Department at the San Francisco Art Institute has been a pioneer in performance, moving image, and installation, and a breeding ground for work at the intersection of the three mediums. As one of the first graduates of the New Genre=s program and now Faculty Director of MFA programs at SFAI, curator Tony Labat, a Cuban native, has been an integral part of the development of New Genres since its inception. He continues to explore cross-disciplinary art production through teaching, curating, and his own practice.

Below are a few photos from the opening:

 

oye

Dust Storm produces a deep red sky in Australia [photos]

I enjoy widespread color disasters like the recent dust storm in Sydney Australia this week.

Southeastern Australian soil is composed of weathered ferric rocks. The iron makes the resulting clay minerals—like nontronite, saponite, and volkonsokite—orange-ish. This process is certainly not unique to the land Down Under. Many regions started out orange but eventually transitioned to brown or black as vegetation sprang up in the fertile clay and composted into dark organic matter. The climate around Sydney is too arid for trees and shrubs to proliferate, so the area retains its original hue. (via slate )

Below are some true colors I enjoyed from Flickr, and also check out photos by Reuters Click for the flickr page…

Sydney Dust Storm Tall Ship by john davey2008.

Sydney Dust storm 23 september 2009 21 by GuyInBondi.

red morning, North Sydney...actual color... by markpinto26919.Strangely tone-matched this morning by andr3w.reilly.

Polaroid Kidd [photography]

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via Needles and Pens Gallery

Mike Brodie aka “The Polaroid Kidd” is a somewhat accidental documentary photographer. By photographing his friends, their homes, and lifestyles, Brodie has captured a marginalized segment of the American population that’s not so prevalent in main stream society. His haunting photos of hobos, punks, and squatters criss-crossing the country in boxcars are reminiscent of Horace Bristol’s Grapes of Wrath era pics that captured migrant workers on their way to California ….except now with facial tattoos. They’re truly amazing. Brodie recently displayed work at LA’s M+B Gallery. – Andrew M. Scott

Ridin Dirty Face.com
Interview on Fecal Face.com